Skip to main content

Multichain Quick Start - Safe

SubQuery TeamAbout 9 min

Multichain Quick Start - Safe

Goals

This page explains how to create an multi-chain indexer for Safeopen in new window, a system that makes secure wallets requiring multiple authorisations. This boosts security and lowers the risk of unauthorised use.

After reading this guide, you'll understand the protocol, know about multi-signature setups, and learn how to set up a SubQuery indexer to monitor and track signed message events on different EVM blockchains.

Setting Up the Indexer

Safe factory contracts have been deployed on various blockchain networks, sometimes using different contract addresses. Nevertheless, as the same smart contract was utilised, every instance retains the same collection of functions and events.

Important

This project operates across multiple chains, making it more complex than other single chain examples.

If you are new to SubQuery, we recommend starting your learning journey with single-chain examples, such as the Ethereum Gravatar example. After understanding the fundamentals, you can then advance to exploring the multi-chain examples.

Before we begin, make sure that you have initialised your project using the provided steps in the Start Here section. Please initialise a Ethereum project. Previously, in the 1. Create a New Project section, you must have noted 3 key files. Let's begin updating them one by one.

As a prerequisite, you will need to generate types from the ABI files of each smart contract. You can obtain these ABI files by searching for the ABIs of the mentioned smart contract addresses on blockchain scanners. For instance, you can locate the ABI for the Safe Ethereum smart contract at the bottom of this pageopen in new window. Additionally, you can kickstart your project by using the EVM Scaffolding approach (detailed here). You'll find all the relevant events to be scaffolded in the documentation for each type of smart contract.

Note

Check the final code repository hereopen in new window to observe the integration of all previously mentioned configurations into a unified codebase.

In this Safe indexing project, our main focus is on configuring the indexer to exclusively capture logs generated by two specific types of Safe smart contracts:

In this Safe indexing project, our primary focus lies in configuring the indexer to selectively capture logs generated by two specific types of Safe smart contracts:

  1. SafeProxy and SafeProxyFactory (contract address on Ethereum: 0x12302fE9c02ff50939BaAaaf415fc226C078613C): These contracts are utilised for cost-efficiency of the deployment of individual safe smart contracts. Safe adopts the proxy patternopen in new window to reduce deployment expenses and enable contract upgradability. The ProxyFactory is employed to create a new safe that links to the proxy.

  2. Individual Safe Smart Contracts: These contracts encompass all the essential functionality needed for establishing and executing Safe transactions.

1. Configuring the Manifest Files

To begin, we will establish an Ethereum indexer. As Safe proxies have undergone multiple updates, the indexing process necessitates the configuration of three handlers. In this illustration, we introduce specific smart contracts along with their respective addresses and logs:

project.yaml
dataSources:
  - kind: ethereum/Runtime
    startBlock: 7450116
    options:
      abi: GnosisSafeProxyFactory
      address: "0x12302fE9c02ff50939BaAaaf415fc226C078613C"
    assets:
      GnosisSafeProxyFactory:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v1.0.0.json
      GnosisSafe:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafe.json
    mapping:
      file: ./dist/index.js
      handlers:
        - kind: ethereum/LogHandler
          handler: handleProxyCreation_1_0_0
          filter:
            topics:
              - ProxyCreation(address)
  - kind: ethereum/Runtime
    startBlock: 9084508
    options:
      abi: GnosisSafeProxyFactory
      address: "0x76E2cFc1F5Fa8F6a5b3fC4c8F4788F0116861F9B"
    assets:
      GnosisSafeProxyFactory:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v1.1.1.json
      GnosisSafe:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafe.json
    mapping:
      file: ./dist/index.js
      handlers:
        - kind: ethereum/LogHandler
          handler: handleProxyCreation_1_1_0
          filter:
            topics:
              - ProxyCreation(address)
  - kind: ethereum/Runtime
    startBlock: 12504126
    options:
      abi: GnosisSafeProxyFactory
      address: "0xa6B71E26C5e0845f74c812102Ca7114b6a896AB2"
    assets:
      GnosisSafeProxyFactory:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v1.3.0.json
      GnosisSafe:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafe.json
    mapping:
      file: ./dist/index.js
      handlers:
        - kind: ethereum/LogHandler
          handler: handleProxyCreation_1_3_0
          filter:
            topics:
              - ProxyCreation(address,address)

The factory smart contracts mentioned above create new contract instances for every new safe. As a result, we must employ dynamic data sources to establish indexers for each of these new contracts. To integrate the dynamic data sources, simply add the following code to the manifest file:

project.yaml
templates:
  - kind: ethereum/Runtime
    name: GnosisSafe
    options:
      abi: GnosisSafe
    assets:
      GnosisSafe:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafe.json
    mapping:
      file: ./dist/index.js
      handlers:
        - kind: ethereum/LogHandler
          handler: handleEthSignMsg
          filter:
            topics:
              - SignMsg(bytes32)

Note

Check out our Manifest File documentation to get more information about the Project Manifest file.

Next, change the name of the file mentioned above to ethereum.yaml to indicate that this file holds the Ethereum configuration.

Then, create a multi-chain manifest file. After, following the steps outlined here, start adding the new networks. After you successfuly apply the correct entities for each chain, you will end up with a single subquery-multichain.yaml file that we'll map to the individual chain manifest files. This multi-chain manifest file will look something like this:

subquery-multichain.yaml
specVersion: 1.0.0
query:
  name: "@subql/query"
  version: "*"
projects:
  - ethereum.yaml
  - matic.yaml
  - op.yaml

Also, you will end up with the individual chains' manifest files like those:

op.yaml
specVersion: 1.0.0
version: 0.0.1
name: ethereum-safe
description: This project indexes the Safe signature data from various chains
runner:
  node:
    name: "@subql/node-ethereum"
    version: ">=3.0.0"
  query:
    name: "@subql/query"
    version: "*"
schema:
  file: ./schema.graphql
network:
  chainId: "10"
  endpoint:
    - https://optimism.llamarpc.com
  # dictionary: https://dict-tyk.subquery.network/query/optimism-mainnet
dataSources:
  - kind: ethereum/Runtime
    startBlock: 110991101
    options:
      abi: GnosisSafeProxyFactory
      address: "0xC22834581EbC8527d974F8a1c97E1bEA4EF910BC"
    assets:
      GnosisSafeProxyFactory:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v1.3.0.json
      GnosisSafe:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafe.json
    mapping:
      file: ./dist/index.js
      handlers:
        - kind: ethereum/LogHandler
          handler: handleProxyCreation_1_3_0
          filter:
            topics:
              - ProxyCreation(address,address)
templates:
  - kind: ethereum/Runtime
    name: GnosisSafe
    options:
      abi: GnosisSafe
    assets:
      GnosisSafe:
        file: ./abis/GnosisSafe.json
    mapping:
      file: ./dist/index.js
      handlers:
        - kind: ethereum/LogHandler
          handler: handleOpSignMsg
          filter:
            topics:
              - SignMsg(indexed bytes32)
repository: https://github.com/subquery/ethereum-subql-starter

As evident from the examples above, we employ various handlers for different chains, while keeping the indexed event logs the same. This approach is adopted to facilitate the identification of the originating network for each specific event (refer to this tip). This strategy will prove beneficial later, as it allows us to incorporate a network field into the entities. This will simplify the execution of filtering, aggregation, and other data manipulation tasks.

2. Updating the GraphQL Schema File

For the sake of simplicity, the schema will consist of just one object, which will appear as follows.

type Sig @entity {
  id: ID!
  account: String!
  msgHash: String!
  timestamp: BigInt!
  network: String!
}

This single object is Sig, containing several parameters to be filled from on-chain data. Additionally, it will include a network attribute explicitly provided through mapping logic.

SubQuery simplifies and ensures type-safety when working with GraphQL entities, smart contracts, events, transactions, and logs. The SubQuery CLI will generate types based on your project's GraphQL schema and any contract ABIs included in the data sources.

yarn
yarn codegen

This action will generate a new directory (or update the existing one) named src/types. Inside this directory, you will find automatically generated entity classes corresponding to each type defined in your schema.graphql. These classes facilitate type-safe operations for loading, reading, and writing entity fields. You can learn more about this process in the GraphQL Schema section.

You can conveniently import all these entities from the following directory:

import { Sig } from "../types";

It will also generate a class for every contract event, offering convenient access to event parameters, as well as information about the block and transaction from which the event originated. You can find detailed information on how this is achieved in the EVM Codegen from ABIs section. All of these types are stored in the src/types/abi-interfaces and src/types/contracts directories.

// Import a smart contract event class generated from provided ABIs

import { ProxyCreationLog as ProxyCreation_v1_0_0 } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v100";
import { ProxyCreationLog as ProxyCreation_v1_1_1 } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v111";
import { ProxyCreationLog as ProxyCreation_v1_3_0 } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v130";

import { SignMsgLog } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafe";

3. Writing the Mappings

Mapping functions define how blockchain data is transformed into the optimized GraphQL entities that we previously defined in the schema.graphql file.

Note

For more information on mapping functions, please refer to our Mappings documentation.

Setting up mappings for this smart contract is straightforward. In this instance, the mappings are stored within the src/mappings directory, with the sole mapping file being factory.ts. Now, let's take a closer look at it:

import { ProxyCreationLog as ProxyCreation_v1_0_0 } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v100";
import { ProxyCreationLog as ProxyCreation_v1_1_1 } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v111";
import { ProxyCreationLog as ProxyCreation_v1_3_0 } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafeProxyFactory_v130";

import { SignMsgLog } from "../types/abi-interfaces/GnosisSafe";
import { createGnosisSafeDatasource as GnosisSafeContract } from "../types";
import { GnosisSafe__factory } from "../types/contracts";
import { Sig } from "../types";
import assert from "assert";

async function handleProxyCreation(proxyAddress: string): Promise<void> {
  let safeInstance = GnosisSafe__factory.connect(proxyAddress, api);
  let callGetOwnerResult = await safeInstance.getOwners();
  if (callGetOwnerResult) GnosisSafeContract({ proxyAddress });
  logger.warn(`Created a datasource for ${proxyAddress}`);
}

export async function handleProxyCreation_1_0_0(
  event: ProxyCreation_v1_0_0
): Promise<void> {
  assert(event.args, "No args in log");
  logger.warn("handleProxyCreation_1_0_0 is tiggered");
  await handleProxyCreation(event.args.proxy);
}

export async function handleProxyCreation_1_1_1(
  event: ProxyCreation_v1_1_1
): Promise<void> {
  assert(event.args, "No args in log");
  logger.warn("handleProxyCreation_1_1_0 is tiggered");
  await handleProxyCreation(event.args.proxy);
}

export async function handleProxyCreation_1_3_0(
  event: ProxyCreation_v1_3_0
): Promise<void> {
  assert(event.args, "No args in log");
  logger.warn("handleProxyCreation_1_3_0 is tiggered");
  await handleProxyCreation(event.args.proxy);
}

async function createSig(event: SignMsgLog, network: string): Promise<void> {
  logger.warn("createSig is tiggered");
  let sig = await Sig.create({
    id: event.transaction.hash,
    account: event.address,
    msgHash: event.topics[1].slice(2),
    timestamp: event.block.timestamp,
    network: network,
  });
  sig.save();
}

export async function handleEthSignMsg(event: SignMsgLog): Promise<void> {
  await createSig(event, "ethereum");
}

export async function handleMaticSignMsg(event: SignMsgLog): Promise<void> {
  await createSig(event, "matic");
}

export async function handleOpSignMsg(event: SignMsgLog): Promise<void> {
  await createSig(event, "op");
}

This code appears to be a TypeScript script for handling events and creating data sources for Gnosis Safe contracts on Ethereum and other networks. Here's a brief explanation of the key components:

This code begins by importing various modules, interfaces, and contract factories required for interacting with Safe contracts and handling events.

Then, there are several event handling functions defined in this code, each corresponding to a specific version of the ProxyCreationLog event. These functions receive event data, ensure that event arguments are present, log messages, and then call the handleProxyCreation function.

handleProxyCreation function handles the creation of a data source for a Safe proxy contract. It connects to the contract, retrieves the owners, and then creates a Safe data source. Subsequently, every subsequent SignMsg event generated in each newly created data source will be processed.

And there are three handling functions (handleEthSignMsg, handleMaticSignMsg, and handleOpSignMsg) that are triggered by this SignMsg event. Those functions utilise the createSig function to create signature objects for Ethereum, Matic, and Op networks, respectively. These functions specify the network and call createSig to handle the event and create the signature.

Finally, createSig function is responsible for creating a signature object based on the provided event data. It extracts relevant information from the event, such as the transaction hash, account, message hash, timestamp, and network, and then saves this signature data.

This code essentially centralises the handling of SignMsg events for various networks and ensures that they are correctly recorded in the Sig object with network-specific attributes, facilitating data tracking and analysis for each network.

🎉 At this stage, we have successfully incorporated all the desired entities and mappings that can be retrieved from Safe smart contracts. For each of these entities, we've a single mapping handler to structure and store the data in a queryable format.

Note

Check the final code repository hereopen in new window to observe the integration of all previously mentioned configurations into a unified codebase.

Build Your Project

Next, build your work to run your new SubQuery project. Run the build command from the project's root directory as given here:

yarn
yarn build

Important

Whenever you make changes to your mapping functions, you must rebuild your project.

Now, you are ready to run your first SubQuery project. Let’s check out the process of running your project in detail.

Run Your Project Locally with Docker

Whenever you create a new SubQuery Project, first, you must run it locally on your computer and test it and using Docker is the easiest and quickiest way to do this.

The docker-compose.yml file defines all the configurations that control how a SubQuery node runs. For a new project, which you have just initialised, you won't need to change anything.

However, visit the Running SubQuery Locally to get more information on the file and the settings.

Run the following command under the project directory:

yarn
yarn start:docker

Note

It may take a few minutes to download the required images and start the various nodes and Postgres databases.

Query your Project

Next, let's query our project. Follow these three simple steps to query your SubQuery project:

  1. Open your browser and head to http://localhost:3000.

  2. You will see a GraphQL playground in the browser and the schemas which are ready to query.

  3. Find the Docs tab on the right side of the playground which should open a documentation drawer. This documentation is automatically generated and it helps you find what entities and methods you can query.

Try the following queries to understand how it works for your new SubQuery starter project. Don’t forget to learn more about the GraphQL Query language.

Sigs

Request

{
  query {
    sigs {
      nodes {
        id
        msgHash
        timestamp
        account
        network
      }
    }
  }
}

Response

{
  "data": {
    "query": {
      "sigs": {
        "nodes": [
          {
            "id": "0x00049ea38f5d4330503fc3a3aec6b38bfd99a4740592846604bec866d8b846f7",
            "msgHash": "3d033a2acc018a468f69d3ed53241bac0ae569eaac4859b26cb3a803d8d2dd21",
            "timestamp": "1646297276",
            "account": "0x00f10F0fD39533bd8567c763B2671cDa00Da7872",
            "network": "ethereum"
          },
          {
            "id": "0x689449b9d3ec424f6272e47f6601bde91086add7f37554e878697403dc6113cc",
            "msgHash": "e621b182c5cf3b806d87cd08d924e832300e149b97aaf0ad9e28c58dde94a479",
            "timestamp": "1646296933",
            "account": "0x00f10F0fD39533bd8567c763B2671cDa00Da7872",
            "network": "ethereum"
          }
        ]
      }
    }
  }
}
Network Metadatas

Request

{
  _metadatas {
    totalCount
    nodes {
      chain
      lastProcessedHeight
    }
  }
}

Response

{
  "data": {
    "_metadatas": {
      "totalCount": 3,
      "nodes": [
        {
          "chain": "137",
          "lastProcessedHeight": 45222964
        },
        {
          "chain": "10",
          "lastProcessedHeight": 110991253
        },
        {
          "chain": "1",
          "lastProcessedHeight": 14312934
        }
      ]
    }
  }
}
Dictionaries

Request

{
  _metadata {
    dynamicDatasources
  }
}

Response

{
  "data": {
    "_metadata": {
      "dynamicDatasources": "[{\"templateName\":\"GnosisSafe\",\"args\":{\"proxyAddress\":\"0xF56F29E3fe941FDFb48859d46bB24425Fd648e55\"},\"startBlock\":110991101}]"
    }
  }
}

What's next?

Well done! You've successfully set up a SubQuery project that's locally running. This project indexes the Safe proxy smart contracts responsible for creating individual Safe contracts. For each created smart contract, it indexes the sign event and stores it in a dedicated entity. What's even more impressive is that it accomplishes this from multiple blockchains and allows GraphQL API requests to be made from a single endpoint.

Tip

Find out how to build a performant SubQuery project and avoid common mistakes in Project Optimisation.

Click here to learn what should be your next step in your SubQuery journey.